Philosophy

The Enrollment Center encourages students to apply to Juniata if they demonstrate the proper desire, motivation, and maturity needed to benefit from a four-year private college experience. Such qualities are evaluated through the application requirements listed below. The Admission Committee places the most emphasis on a student's high school transcript. The second most important item would be standardized testing results followed by activities, community involvement and all the things that make up the student's life. Juniata seeks a broad student population base including a wide geographic and cultural representation from a variety of social and economic backgrounds.

The College reserves the right to determine which applicants will be admitted. The selection of candidates is made without regard to race, sex, religion, creed, national origin, and or handicap.

Guidelines for Entering Freshmen

Application and Information

Students may apply to Juniata using the Common Application any time after completion of their junior year in secondary school. The Common Application begins accepting applications August 1 of the senior year. A complete secondary school transcript indicating courses and grades (including senior year courses and grades to date) must be sent from the applicant's guidance office along with SAT-I and/or ACT scores, an essay, and a letter of recommendation.

Candidates for freshman admission can choose from three application options - Early Decision I, Early Decision II, and Regular Decision:

  • Early Decision IApplication Deadline November 15.  The Early Decision (ED I) option is available for those students who know that Juniata is their number one choice. Early Decision is a binding agreement; applicants agree to apply ED I only to Juniata and to enroll if offered admission.  ED I students receive admission notification by December 15th.  Accepted ED I students will receive financial aid notification by late January. A non-refundable $400 deposit is required by February 15th.  Please refer to the Early Decision Information section of the Common Application when deciding whether or not to apply as an ED I candidate.
  • Early Decision II – Application Deadline January 1.  The Early Decision II (ED II) option is available for those students who decide that Juniata is their top choice after November 15th.   Once all required materials are received, ED II applicants will receive an admission decision by February 15th.  If applying for need-based aid, students must complete the FAFSA by February 15th. The ED II option is a binding agreement and requires the student to submit a non-refundable $400 deposit two weeks after receipt of a financial planning award.  Please refer to the Early Decision Information section of the Common Application when deciding whether or not to apply as an ED II candidate.
  • Regular Decision Application Deadline February 15*.  Regular Decision Candidates are encouraged to apply in the fall. Students who apply before November 1 may receive an admission decision in the fall. Students applying after January 1 will receive a decision 4 to 6 weeks after the application is complete.  Students who wish to be considered for all additional competitive scholarships should have their application submitted no later than January 1. Students accepted as a Regular Decision candidate must submit a non-refundable $400 deposit by May 1 to reserve a space in the entering class.

Note:  Students who wish to be considered for all additional competitive scholarships should have their application submitted no later than January 1. 

* - Please call the Enrollment Center (814-641-3420) to inquire whether applications are still being accepted beyond any application deadline.


Contents of Application

An application for admission consists of the components listed below. Credentials that are reviewed include: high school academic record, SAT or ACT test results, completed application form including evidence of extracurricular involvement, recommendation letter(s), and a personal essay.

High School Transcript A secondary school program including at least 16 college preparatory courses from an approved public, private, or parochial school must be completed or anticipated. These courses must include a minimum of four years of academic English, two years of a foreign language, and a combination of mathematics, laboratory science courses, social sciences and humanities.

A complete secondary school transcript must be sent from the applicant’s guidance office, noting all courses taken and grades received from the freshman year through the junior year. A listing of courses to be taken in the senior year should accompany this transcript and grades from the first marking period and/or the first semester should be sent when they become available. Upon graduation, students must submit a final secondary school transcript noting graduation date and guidance counselor signature or raised seal.

Standardized Test Results Results of the Scholastic Assessment Tests (SAT-I) taken in the junior and/or senior year are required. Students may also choose to participate in Juniata's Optional Standardized Test Program.The American College Test (ACT), taken in either the junior or senior year, may be substituted for the SAT-I. Applicants whose native language is not English also must provide results of a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or scores from an approved English language program. International applicants who have studied wholly in an English speaking high school are required to submit an SAT/ACT score. All other international students are not required to submit SAT or ACT scores but should still submit TOEFL (or similar) results. SAT-II: Subject Tests are not required but may be submitted for admission consideration.   Contact the Admissions Office for more information.

Application Form Juniata uses the "Common Application". Application forms may be submitted at www.commonapp.org. The application requires a listing of extracurricular activities in both school and community, guidance counselor or teacher letter(s) of recommendation, and an essay which answers one of the essay questions listed in the application for admission. The applicant should complete the form and submit it online.


Campus Visits

Although not generally required for admission, the College strongly recommends that each prospective student make a visit to campus. A campus visit serves as an opportunity to learn more about the College, its students, and faculty, and is a great way for the admission team to meet interested students. During the academic year, the enrollment center has a variety of visit options. Students are encouraged to visit http://www.juniata.edu/admission/campus-visit/ to select the appropriate visit program to serve their information needs. In general the Enrollment Center is open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mondays through Fridays from September through April,  and for selected Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon.  Appointments for the summer months can be scheduled for 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays.  Please contact the Office of Admission at 814-641-3428 for more information or to schedule an appointment.


Guidelines for Transfer Students

Applicants are considered transfer students if they have graduated from an approved secondary school program and completed the equivalent of one full-time semester of coursework at a regionally accredited community college, junior college, or four-year institution. Student's work will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Notification of a transfer admission decision is given within one month upon receipt of all credentials.  July 1 for fall semester, December 1 for spring semester.

Application deadlines for transfer students are July 1 for fall semester entry and December 1 for spring semester entry, though earlier submission is highly encouraged.

First semester freshmen who transfer a semester worth of transfer credits MUST take CWS (College Writing Seminar) even if they have taken English credits.  Students who wish to demonstrate they have competency should bring with them a portfolio of writing to be reviewed by the English department.


Contents of Transfer Application

An application for transfer admission consists of the following components:

Application  Juniata uses the "Common Application" Transfer Application. Forms may be obtained at www.commonapp.org. The application requires transfer statement which explains why the student wishes to transfer. The applicant should complete the form and submit online.

High School Transcripts The Office of Admission requires an official, final high school transcript indicating final grades, class rank (if applicable) and date of graduation. The transcript should be sent directly from the school to the Juniata admission office.  Students with more than 24 credits are not required to send their high school transcripts.

Standardized Test Scores SAT and or ACT scores should also be submitted. Scores can either be sent directly from the testing agency, or may be indicated on the official high school transcript. Juniata 's code number for the SAT is 2341, and for the ACT 3600. SAT/ACT results are often waived for qualified transfer students whose previous institution did not require scores for admission.

College Transcripts Transfer applicants must also submit an official transcript from each college previously attended and a college catalog or course descriptions of classes taken at previous institutions. The transcript must be sent directly to Juniata from the former institution(s). Catalogs and course descriptions are used to evaluate transfer credit.

Transfer College Report Form The Transfer College Report Form is a required document. It must be completed by a college official who has access to your academic and disciplinary records.  The form can also be found at http://www.juniata.edu/admission/student-info/transferring-credits.php


Financial Aid

All transfer students offered admission are eligible to apply for financial aid. The application procedure is the same as that for new freshman students and is found under the section “Student Finances.’’ For further information, contact: Transfer Coordinator, Enrollment Center, Juniata College, Huntingdon, PA 16652-2196.


Transfer Credit

Juniata does not accept in transfer any coursework below a grade of "C-" nor coursework of a strictly technical or remedial nature, nor physical education coursework. Credit is normally only awarded for courses taken at a similarly accredited institution. Special circumstances may affect the transferability of an individual student record. These cases will be handled on an individual basis and decisions will be based on Juniata's academic policy. An official credit evaluation will be completed by the Office of the Registrar after a student has been admitted to Juniata.

Students will have their work evaluated on a course-by-course basis. Courses equivalent to Juniata's curriculum course description will be granted direct course equivalence. Coursework accepted in transfer may be used to meet both liberal arts graduation requirements and Program of Emphasis requirements.

While Juniata will accept credit from any regionally accredited college or university, the college has formal transfer agreements with Harrisburg Area Community College and Penn Highlands Community College. Articulation agreements are in place to facilitate the transfer of credit from one institution to another. Contact the Transfer Coordinator at either institution for more information.

Juniata also offers a 2+2 Joint Enrollment Program with Penn Highlands Community College (PHCC) specifically the Juniata Accounting, Business & Economics Department. Students apply, and are admitted, to both Juniata and PHCC at the same time.  Accepted students are able to be advised by faculty at both colleges, receive priority in registration and room assignment when transferring to Juniata, and have guaranteed transfer credit. The student will receive the Associate degree from Penn Highlands, and either the BA or BS degree from Juniata. Consult the Enrollment Center for more information.

Other Admissions Programs

Supported Admission

Students who are offered supported Admission are admitted to Juniata with the belief that they have the potential to succeed in college, but would benefit from  extra mentoring and assistance from Academic Support staff.

During the fall semester, all freshmen enroll in the required four-credit foundation course - College Writing Seminar- designated to provide first year students with reading, writing, computer, library, time management, and study skills necessary for success in college.  For a Supported Admission student, especially designed Freshmen Advisor is the student's CWS instructor or a professor during the first semester.  Freshmen Advisors work closely with students to monitor their academic performance and address individual needs.

The program for supported admit students includes regularly scheduled, required appointments with an academic counselor (at least five such meetings) throughout the fall semester to monitor and assess progress in each class, discuss issues related to transitioning into college, discuss how to prepare for and take tests, give pre-registration advice, assist with selection of a second adviser, and review many other topics appropriate to the individual circumstances of each student.

Supported admit students also benefit from resources offered through or coordinated by the Office of Academic Support Services.  These include use of the Writing Center, how to best utilize the faculty and advisors, determining when referral to the counseling center is appropriate, how to build an academic schedule and design a Program of Emphasis, how to go about exploring possible careers, etc. There is a broad network of support and advisors available to all students.

While receiving the additional support described herein, Supported Admission students carry a typical course load of 12-16 credits during the first semester and are in no way distinguishable from their peers in the classroom. Upon completion of one semester in good academic standing, the student is no longer required to have regular appointments with the Office of AcademiC Support Services, but is able to utilize their continued advocacy and resources.


Deferred Admission

Deferred Admission is designed for students who wish to begin their college studies at a time other than the fall semester after graduation from secondary school. Application procedures and requirements are the same as for all other applicants. Candidates should note their interest to be considered under the Deferred Admission Program by contacting the admission office. Students may defer admission for up to one year.


Spring Semester Admission

Application procedures and requirements are the same as fall admission. The Spring semester application deadline is December 1, though earlier submission is encouraged. Interested persons may contact the Enrollment Center for further information.


Early Admission

Juniata encourages applications from students who demonstrates the aptitude, desire and maturity to begin college level work prior to the completion of his/her secondary school program. Students may consider enrolling at Juniata the last year or the last semester of their senior year. A formal application for admission must be completed. In addition students must: 1) Have an admission interview on campus; 2) Provide a written recommendation from their guidance counselor supporting their application for early admission and indicating they will receive a diploma either at the end of their junior year or after they have successfully completed one year of college level work, which includes college level English; and 3) Provide a written statement from their parents indicating approval of early admission. Applicants are expected to meet all other admission requirements.


Home-Schooled Students

Juniata welcomes applications from students who are home-schooled and have been approved by their local school district. Students must submit an application for admission and include standardized test results, an application essay, letter(s) of recommendation and portfolio of academic work. Students are also encouraged to interview and submit additional information to support their application. Please contact the Juniata Home School Coordinator in the Enrollment Center for further information.


International Students

International students are strongly encouraged to submit applications. The procedures for admission are the same as for other freshman or transfer applicants,  In addition, for applicants whose native language is not English, a TOEFL score of 80 Internet-based (or equivalent IELTS or Pearson PTE Academic) or higher is required for unconditional admission to Juniata.

Minumum section scores are also required. (http:www.juniata.edu/departments/international/iep/courses.html)

All students who submit a TOEFL score, however may still be tested upon arrival to ensure appropriate course placement, including ESL courses. If you have submitted a score lower than 80 iBT/550 PBT, or you test below that level on arrival, your status will be English-Conditional.

A complete set of original or notarized educational credentials with certified English translations is also necessary for international applicants and is required before eligibility for admission can be determined. In addition, an affidavit of financial responsibility is required (by U.S. law) before an I-20 form (necessary for procuring a student visa from a U.S. Embassy or Consulate) can be issued.

Further information regarding international applications is available from:

Director of International Admission
Enrollment Center
Juniata College
Huntingdon, PA 16652-2196 USA

FAX: (814) 641-3100 E-mail: usastudy@juniata.edu

 


English-Conditional Admission

International applicants with TOEFL test scores of 52 - 79 Internet-Based (iBT)*/470 – 549 Paper-Based (PBT)* may, if otherwise qualified academically, be granted English-Conditional (EC) Admission, provided they complete the appropriate English as a Second Language (ESL) coursework in Juniata's Intensive English Program (IEP).

The IEP follows all Juniata policies regarding advancement in its courses. Students may earn up to 15 credits in their ESL courses toward graduation requirements. While taking ESL courses the IEP faculty evaluates the students' English proficiency and they may enroll in academic coursework outside the IEP when appropriate.

English Conditional Students will also be required to sign a Statement of Understanding concerning English-Conditional Admission prior to beginning their studies. As needed, continued English language support is offered to all international students throughout their degree program. For more information, please refer to the Intensive English Program section.

*Equivalent IELTS and Pearson PTE scores are also accepted.


International Baccalaureate

International Baccalaureate Diploma recipients are granted credit for one full year (30 credits) toward a degree at Juniata. Students who have an IB Diploma normally enter the College with sophomore standing. IB certificate recipients receive course credit for each higher level examination passed with a score of 5 or higher. To receive this credit the student will meet with the appropriate department chair or designee to consider the advantage or disadvantage of accepting credit. IB credits may be counted toward degree requirements.


Non-Degree Students

Any person who wants to take coursework at Juniata as a non-degree student need not apply for admission consideration, but must provide proof of academic ability. The Registrar enrolls and registers all non-degree candidates.

Non-degree students are required to fill out the registration form located at our Registrar's Office website under Class Schedules: http://legacy.juniata.edu/services/registrar/jcsa/ Cost of course credit will be the tuition charge of part-time tuition.

Non-Traditional Student Admission Programs

Returning Adult Students

Qualified students who have been away from the classroom are welcome to attend Juniata. Courses are offered for both degree and non-degree seeking students and may be taken on either a full-time or part-time basis. Students are enrolled in regular Juniata classes; there are currently no evening, weekend, or accelerated programs for returning adult students.  Students must meet admission criteria. Degree-seeking students may apply either as transfer or freshman students. Consult the Enrollment Center for further details.


Education Certification Program

Students with a B.A. or B.S. from an accredited four-year American college or university and who meet Education Department criteria may take courses at Juniata to receive their education certification. Students may take courses on a full-time or part-time basis. A minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA in the student's previous coursework is required. Consult the Enrollment Center or Education Department for further details.


Second Baccalaureate Degree Program

Students who have earned a bachelor's degree at an accredited, domestic American university or college and desire a second bachelor's degree reflecting in-depth study in a discipline other than that of their first degree may enroll upon completion of application requirements. Courses from a previous degree will be evaluated on a course by course basis and may be used to fulfill graduation requirements. Students must meet all Juniata graduation requirements, fulfill the department requirements within the new discipline, and observe the College residency requirement. International students who desire a second degree will be evaluated individually for their candidacy. For further information, contact the Enrollment Center.


Senior Citizens Program

Citizens who are 60 years of age or older may take courses on a part-time basis.


High School Student Programs

Juniata continues to support what was previously known as Dual Enrollment for high school students in our non-degree visiting student program for Huntingdon County and the surrounding area. In the interest of promoting a positive post secondary experience, students who are a junior or senior in high school can study a course per semester (maximum of 4) with supporting signatures from their guidance counselors and/or instructional supervisor.  Please note that the student must demonstrate a readiness based on the student’s ability to be successful.

The course availability will be based on open seats and prerequisites and co-requisites requirements with all rules and fees applied in accordance to campus policy.  Students are responsible for any fees for labs, field trips, supplies and books and does not include Internships, Credit by Exam, Independent Studies or College Writing Seminar (CWS). Students must complete a Visiting Student form available from the Registrar’s Office and have it signed with official support signatures. Billing will go directly to the student for payment.  The cost per credit is $100 per credit for Fall 2016.  Students who are considered free or reduced lunch are eligible for free tuition.   Please talk to your High School Guidance Counselor to learn more about it.

Master's Programs at Juniata

Master of Accounting (MAcc)

The Master of Accounting program is designed to prepare students for entry into a world where individuals must have a command of relevant knowledge about accounting, management, and economics, and have a capacity to apply that knowledge in addressing problems and making decisions. The program will emphasize the development of skills necessary for a productive long term career along with a firm understanding of accounting theories and concepts. This understanding and development of skills will give students the knowledge they need to do well on the CPA Examination and achieve their career goals. Additionally, accounting skills are highly valued in the marketplace and can lead to career possibilities in corporate, non-profit sector, and governmental work.

Admission to the Master of Accounting program is administered by the Accounting, Business, and Economics Department. For more information or to apply to the program, please use the link below.

Application can be mailed to:

Dominick Peruso, Chair, Accounting, Business, and Economics
Master of Accounting Program
Juniata College
1700 Moore Street
Huntingdon, PA 16652

Master of Accounting (MAcc) Info: http://www.juniata.edu/academics/departments/accounting-business-economics/master-of-accounting/

Nonprofit Leadership Master's Degree

Program Description:

The program in Nonprofit Leadership at Juniata College is an interdisciplinary Master of Arts (MA) program that provides students with the fundamental theories and skills leaders need to work successfully in the nonprofit sector. The program engages students in a combination of disciplinary perspectives, blending theory and practice so that students are well equipped to address the challenging social issues of our time.

The program addresses all areas of the sector including working with boards and volunteers, marketing and fundraising, fiscal managements, assessment and evaluation, advocacy and social change. The program provides a special emphasis on social innovation and problem solving skills, particularly for working with communities who have been marginalized by geography, culture, or custom.

Program goals include:

  • engaging and strengthening the ability of local leaders to utilize interdisciplinary knowledge systems to work collaboratively
  • teaching skill sets that enable leaders to be analytic and adaptive as they innovate to meet emergent challenges
  • supporting leaders in developing a strategic impact vision and strategy with a trajectory to compel social change.

The Juniata Nonprofit Leadership MA is a fully online program.

Academic Program Requirements

The Nonprofit Leadership MA consists of a set of four required courses, a series of electives, and a capstone project or thesis. Students have the option of a master's thesis or a capstone project to complete the degree. A master's thesis involves completing and defending original research. Students may do a capstone project, individually or as part of an interdisciplinary team, to address a specific issue for a particular organization. A thesis committee must approve and review all capstone projects.

The program offers two MA options.

NPL MA 30 credits
Students entering the program with work or significant volunteer experience (1 or more years volunteering with a specific agency, or 2 or more supervised internship experiences) in a nonprofit environment can complete the master's program in one year (12 months, 4 semesters) with 30 credit hours of coursework.

NPL MA 42 credits
Success in the program, as well in the nonprofit sector, requires students to have some level of relevant professional work experience. Students with no work or significant volunteer experience must complete a for-credit internship in addition to the other MA requirements, to finish the MA with 42 credit hours.

Students may transfer in up to 6 credits (subject to the approval of the graduate committee) to fulfill program requirements. In addition to taking credits at Juniata, students enrolled in the program may take up to 6 credits at our partner institutions and up to 12 credits while studying abroad at our international partner sites.

Certificate Programs

Students may also choose to enroll in non-degree, certificate programs. To earn a certificate, students must complete three courses within a certificate area. The certificate program is designed for professionals interested in enhancing their sills in particular areas of professional development. Courses may be applied to a MA degree if a student chooses to enroll in the full program at a later date. Certificate options include:

  • Leadership
  • Social Innovation and Social Change
  • Conflict Transformation
  • Finances and Marketing

Curriculum:

NP-501   Foundations Nonprofit (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) In this course students will develop an informed understanding of the nature of the nonprofit sector, and the criteria that shape and define nonprofit organizations. Students will explore the factors that have shaped the expansion of nonprofit work and current trends influencing the structure of nonprofit organizations and the roles they play in governance and social change efforts as part of civil society.

NP-502   21st Century Leadership (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course examines the challenges of providing leadership in the information age of global and cultural contexts. Leadership as manifested in today's workplace provides both opportunity, and a great responsibility. The role and function of leaders looks very different today than years ago. Change is the norm. Leaders must understand today's challenges and be able to function effectively given a borderless, multicultural, virtual, and diverse group of partners, stakeholders and constituents.

NP-503   Leading and Managing NP (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) The past decade has seen an explosion of nonprofit and nongovernmental organizations, and an accompanying expansion of academic research and training about, and for, the field. This course utilizes this information to explore what it means to lead and manage nonprofit organizations. In particular this course will explore leadership roles within a nonprofit organization, the management tasks necessary to develop and run a healthy and successful organization, and examine what leadership looks like outside the organization when working with constituents, stakeholders, partners and the " opposition. " Students will learn theories to enhance their capacities to provide effective leadership for nonprofit organizations and explore the leadership skills needed to build partnerships across sectors, respond to emerging trends and challenges, to partner with diverse groups, and to leverage power in order to bring about desired changes.

NP-504   NP Fiscal Management (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This is a core course in the Non-Profit Leadership Master's program. The course introduces students to the basics of financial management as applied to non-profit organizations. Students will be invited to learn about the fundamentals of budgeting and accounting for public, health, and not-for-profit organizations. Through readings, webcasts, online chat, assigned problems, case studies, and problem sets, students will gain an understanding of how to use financial information in organizational planning, implementation, control, reporting, and analysis.

NP-510   Organizational Communication and Culture (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course blends the exploration of a critical, theoretical understanding of organizational culture with the theories and skills of leadership and change, equipping students with the knowledge and ability to develop a healthy, successful nonprofit organization. As part of this course, students will explore how values shape and define organizational culture, along with management structure, geographic scope, size, client groups and governance structures. Students will develop the theories and skills needed to lead organizational change processes.

NP-520   Fundraising for the NP (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course builds the student's understanding of the sources of income for nonprofit organizations, with a specific focus on the fundamentals of effective resource development and fundraising. Students will explore principles and theories of " best practices " of fundraising, the fundraising process (research, planning, cultivation, solicitation, stewardship, and evolution), and emerging trends in the field (crowd sourcing, public/private partnerships, social investment, and social entrepreneurship). The course also provides students with a clear understanding of the historical, organizational, legal and ethical contexts that define how leaders and managers raise funds to support the organizations mission and vision.

NP-522   Marketing in Info Age (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) This course examines traditional marketing and how it has adjusted as a result of the challenges and opportunities of marketing in the Information Age. Information technology as manifested in the Internet and other enabling technologies creates a valuable marketing opportunity, and a great peril. As customers and competitors learn the power of real-time information, companies must learn to compete in a world where location and other long-held advantages may be less important.

NP-530   Conflict and Change (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits)

NP-540   Social Entrepreneurship (Variable; Yearly; 3.00 Credits) The goal of the class is to expose students to the field of social entrepreneurship, with a particular emphasis on understanding how social entrepreneurs effect positive social change. The course aims to provide you with a comprehensive overview of the emerging field of social entrepreneurship, understand what makes it distinctive from traditional entrepreneurship, and identify and understand the framework needed to start and grow a sustainable social venture. The course will explore the assessment of the variations of social entrepreneurship, from the creation of an organization aimed at creating positive social change, to social responsibility initiatives within the concept of corporate social entrepreneurship.

NP-590   Internship (Variable; Variable; 2.00-9.00 Credits) See catalog

NP-594   Internship Seminar (Variable; Variable; 2.00-6.00 Credits) See catalog

NP-595   Capstone (Variable; Yearly; 3.00-6.00 Credits) The Nonprofit MA capstone is designed to provide students with the opportunity to synthesize the materials they have worked with over the course of the program. The capstone provides students with a critical learning opportunity either in the form of public service project where students work with a client organization on a specific challenge or task, or conduct original research. The capstone project provides students with the opportunity to pursue a specific body of knowledge within a particular context, thus honing their expertise in a specific knowledge area, while also developing research skills, gathering and analyzing data, and in the case of a project, the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills to a real-time need. Students are encouraged to work in teams to complete the capstone project.

Certificate Programs

The Genomics Leadership Initiative at Juniata College

The Genomics Leadership Initiative at Juniata College has been funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and National Science Foundation. The initiative seeks to achieve its goal by developing a genomics certificate program, a leadership module, and student summer research experiences.

GENOMICS CERTIFICATE PROGRAM:

Comprised of seven courses, the genomics certificate addresses both the science and the broader ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) surrounding progress and discoveries in the field of genomics. The ethical, legal and social issues surrounding advances in genomics provides a strong focus for practicing a breadth of knowledge and skills; the understanding of the scientific foundation of genomics provides the focus for developing an interdisciplinary base and cross disciplinary understanding of the life sciences in an era of “big data”. To help support this part of the program the grant has also funded an ELSI faculty development workshop, a seminar series, stipends for faculty developing new or revised classes, and stipends for faculty to formally assess the learning gains of students as a result of programmatic activities.

What is a certificate?

In general, an undergraduate certificate provides an interdisciplinary curriculum that is not available within any single academic unit. A certificate offers the possibility of a more cohesive general education experience oriented around a theme and taught by faculty who work together as a group on an ongoing basis and have common inter-departmental learning objectives and assessments. The awarding of the certificate is noted on the student’s transcript.

Who is this certificate for?

Students intending to pursue careers in biological research and medicine are the primary target. However, students interested in careers in public policy, public health, law, and business will gain by developing similar competencies.

Why should a student get this certificate?

As cost of a human genome approaches $1000, appreciation of both the science and the ethical, legal, and societal implications of genomics has become an increasingly pressing issue. Design of the certificate was based on recommendations from a joint document between the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) entitled, “Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians.” This report emphasized the importance of integrative scientific approaches, scientific reasoning, intellectual curiosity, communication and decision making skills, adaptability, ethical principles, and understanding of patients as individuals and in a social context. HHMI has funded Juniata College to implement this certificate program.

Description and Goals of a Certificate in Genomics, Ethics, and Society

Comprised of seven courses, the certificate addresses both the science and the broader ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) surrounding progress and discoveries in the field of genomics. No area of modern biology provides a more appropriate focus for combining the humanities and sciences than the ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) of the human genome project and the evolution of the field of personalized medicine. The subject cannot be completely addressed without the input of specialists working across disciplinary boundaries. The ethical, legal and social issues surrounding advances in genomics provide a strong focus for practicing a breadth of knowledge and skills while understanding the acts of judgment and social contexts involved in the development and application of scientific knowledge; the understanding of the scientific foundation of genomics provides the focus for developing an interdisciplinary base and cross disciplinary understanding of the life sciences in an era of “big data”.

Learning objectives

Students who attain genomics certification will be able to:

Describe the basic concepts and principles of genomics.
Explain the scope of genomics from genes to society.
Integrate knowledge of the chemical, physical, mathematical and computational bases of genomics.
Explain the importance of the place of genomics in the human effort to understand natural phenomena, including its history and social impact.
Be able to make and justify ethical judgments about genomics research and its uses in medical practice and elsewhere.
Use the skills and interdisciplinary perspectives of the liberal arts in understanding trends in genomics and communicating them to academic peers and others.
Apply the process of science to questions in genomics.
Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of a selected field in genomics.
Progress into a leadership role, working with experts and non-experts, with an awareness of the likely results of one's actions and an understanding of how results might differ in different settings and different cultures.

REQUIREMENTS

Core Courses: All students pursuing a genomics certificate must take four core courses required for a genomics certificate. Download the Genome Certificate Sheet to organize and plan your course of study.

  1. Genomics, Ethics and Society (IC 203; Fall; MW 2-3:50PM; CWS prereq) A team-taught course that lays the foundations for interdisciplinary work on the ethical and social dimensions of genomics.
  2. A course covering basic molecular biology, genetics, and genomics:

    Biology II BI 106; Fall; N division class; T/Th 9 to 10:20AM, or T/Th 1 to 2:20PM, Discussion Sections Weds 8 or 10AM; BI-105 CH-105 prereqs
    Human Biology BI 109; Not for biology majors; Fall; N division class; MWF 9 to 9:55PM

  3. At least three credits of statistics:

    Biostatistics with lab BI 305, Fall; N and QS division class; T/TH 10:30 to 11:50AM; Lab M 1 to 2:55PM or 3 to 4:55; BI105 or ESS100 prereq
    Environmetrics ESS 230; Spring N division and QS class; T/Th 10:30 to 11:55AM; Sophomore standing
    Introductory Probability and Statistics MA 220, Fall MWF 10 to 10:55AM; Discussion T noon; Spring MWF 1 to 1:55PM, TH 2:30 to 3:25PM; QS and N division class, prereq MA130.

  4. One course covering informatics and analysis of large data sets:

    Information Discovery IM 241, Fall QS and S division class; T/TH 9 to 10:20AM; prereqs IT110 or IT111 or CS110 or Instructors Permission (Loren Rhodes)
    Biological Sciences Research Methods (Lamendella, Buonaccorsi, and Keeney sections)
    Even Spring Semesters (Buonaccorsi), N division class; MW 2 to 4:50PM; prereqs BI207 or Instructors Permission
    Odd Fall Semesters (Lamendella), N division class; schedule TBA; prereqs BI207 or Instructors Permission
    Even Fall Semesters (Keeney), N division class; schedule TBA; prereqs BI207 or Instructors Permission
    Computer Science 110 section G only, Spring N class, MWF 8AM to 8:55AM
    Unix CS 255U, 1 credit every semester, T 8AM, prereq Computer Science 110 or Instructors Permission (Loren Rhodes);

    AND

    Perl CS255P, 2 credits, Summer, prereq Computer Science 110 or Instructors Permission (Loren Rhodes), sophomore standing, self study

    or

    Python CS255Y, 2 credits, Summer, prereq Computer Science 110 or Instructors Permission (Loren Rhodes), sophomore standing, self study

Electives: In addition to the core courses, students must take at least three elective courses related to ELSI genomic themes:

Social History of Medicine History HS 211; Every Fall; May count as a either a CA, or an H or I division class. T/TH 1 to 2:20PM
Medieval Medicine: Health and Disease in the Middle Ages History HS 399, Every Spring. H division class. MW 11AM to 12:20PM
Doctors, Medicine and Literature Russian RU 299 01, Fall of odd numbered years. May count as a either a CA, or an H or I division class. T/TH 10:30 to 11:50PM, T Noon to 12:55pm.
Science and Human Values Philosophy PL 250, Spring of odd numbered years, H division class.
Moral Judgment Psychology 3XX, Every Summer online, S division class.
Leadership in the 21rst Century. Business EB 299, Odd Springs online (3 cr), S division class

AND Executive Leadership Business 199, 1 cr, Spring, 3PM, Weds.


Certificate in Geographical Information Systems

Geographic Information System (GIS) and spatial reasoning are a mainstay knowledge base for working professionals in environmental science, resource management, local and regional planning, disease monitoring and evaluation, real estate, military planning, and social science research. The Juniata GIS certificate program is offered jointly by the Environmental Science and Studies and the Computer Science and Information Technology Departments. We have two tracks to prepare a student for a career in any of the GIS fields. The first track has a focus on Environmental Science. This track has more courses in field methods in GIS and spatial analysis. The second track has a focus on Information Technology. This track has more courses in programming and data mining. the certificate is open to students in all departments as well as Juniata alumni.

Requirements for GIS (18-21 credits):

We have designed this certificate based on looking at successful programs. We have tried to match core strengths of other successful programs while differentiating ourselves based on our key strengths. The cores courses include

  • Introduction to geographic information systems
  • Topics in remote sensing and spatial analysis
  • Quantitative methods

The ways we differentiate ourselves is through our strength in field data collection techniques for environmental sciences. We include tracks in Environmental Science and in Information Technology

The requirements of the certification are as follows:

Quantitative field intro (1 course) (4 credits): This section requires the student to have a quantitative introductory class in their field. The requirement of this course is that it has a lab or quantitative section where Excel or other spreadsheet or database program is used to compile and represent or analyze data. One course from the following:

  • Environmental Track
    • ESS 100: Introduction to Environmental Science
  • IT Track
    • IT 111: Principles of Information Technology, OR
    • CS 110: Computer Science I

Core Statistics or data analysis (1 course) (3-4 credits): One course from this section must be taken:

  • Environmental Track
    • ESS 230: Environmetrics, OR
    • BI 305: Biostatistics
  • IT Track
    • IM 241: Information Discovery 

Core Geographic Information Courses (3 courses)(8 credits)

  • Both Tracks:
    • ESS 330: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (or Methods in Marine Science)
    • ESS 337: Advanced Topics in GIS and Remote Sensing

Field data collection component (1 course) (3-4 credits): This section is intended to have students exposed to the vagaries of field data collection. It is preferred that students collect spatially explicit data using GPS technologies or other spatially explicit survey methods. Database manage or other courses that explore the process of data collection will also meet this requirement.

  • IT Track:
    • CS 370: Database Management/li>
  • Environmental Track: (Pick One From)
    • ESS 399: Ecology of Fishes(3)
    • ESS 399: Forestry 
    • ESS 399: Hydrology at the Station(3)
    • ESS 399: Wildlife Techniques(3)
    • BIO 399: Field and Stream: Grant & Muth(4)
    • ESS 350: Field Research Methods(4)
    • GL 240: Geological Field Meth. I(4)

Capstone or project requirement (1-4):

  • IT Track: This will normally be a GIS related project done via an IT 307/308 and 380 or 480: Innovation for Industry course series, but it may be done as an independent study or project stemming from another course
  • Environmental Track: This will normally be a GIS related project done via ESS 410 Senior Capstone class, but it may be done as an independent study or project stemming from another course

Table of Requirements

Environmental track

Information Technology Track

Requirement

Credits

ESS 100

IT 111/ CS110

Base Course

3-4

ESS 230 Environmetrics

Or

BI 305 BioStat

IM 241:  Information Discovery

Data Analysis and Discovery

3-4

ESS 330: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 

ESS 330: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 

Basic GIS

4

ESS 337 Advanced Topics in GIS and Remote Sensing

ESS 337 Advanced Topics in GIS and Remote Sensing

Remote Sensing and Modeling

3

One from

ESS 399 Ecology of Fishes: (3)

ESS 399 Forestry

ESS 399 Hydrology at RFS: (3)

ESS 399 Wildlife Techniques (3)

BIO 399 Field and Stream: (4)

ESS 350 Field Research Methods—(4)

GL 240 Geological Field Methods. I  (4)

CS 370 Database Management

Data Collection

3-4

Senior Capstone or Other GIS project

I4I or other project with Spatial Data

Capstone

1-4

Total Credits

 

 

18-21

Contacts:

Neil Pelkey, PhD.: Associate Professor Environmental Science and Studies and IT
Email: pelkey@juniata.edu or (814) 641-3589

Dennis Johnson, PhD.: Professor and Chair Environmental Science
Email: johnson@juniata.edu or (814) 641- 5335

Loren Rhodes, PhD.: Professor and Chair, Computer Science and Information Technology
Email: rhodes@juniata.edu or (814) 641-3620