Thursday, June 1

Start your weekend early! Attend dinner on campus or make plans to hit your favorite old (or new) late-night haunts. Either way, you’re off to a great beginning and can make the most of Friday’s morning activities.

Registration
3–9 p.m.
Lobby, von Liebig Center for Science
Pick up room keys and registration packets with itineraries upon arrival.

Welcome Dinner
6–7 p.m. 
Baker Refectory, Ellis Hall
Enjoy this relaxing, casual dinner with classmates, friends, and other Juniatians.

             Prices
             Adult: $10.00
             Child age 6-12: $5.00
             Child 5 and under: Free

Class of 1967 Pizza Party
6–9:30 p.m.
The Class of 1967 will kick off their reunion weekend with a casual pizza dinner and time to reconnect with classmates. Soft drinks, beer, and wine will be provided.

             Prices
             Class of ’67 Member: Complimentary
             Adult (non-class member): $13.00

Friday, June 2

Make it a fun-filled day attending Alumni College classes and catching up on campus happenings at the Alumni Association Meeting. In the evening, we’ll come together to celebrate all the reunion classes and honor the Class of 1967 at the All-Class Celebration. Afterwards, be sure to join your classmates and party into the evening.

Registration
7:30 a.m.–9 p.m.
Lobby, von Liebig Center for Science
Pick up room keys and registration packets with itineraries upon arrival.

Buffet Breakfast
8–9 a.m. 
Baker Refectory, Ellis Hall

             Prices
             Adult: $6.00
             Child age 6-12: $3.00
             Child 5 and under: Free
             Class of ’67 Member: Complimentary

Ecclesiastes: “Agnostic” Wisdom in the Bible
Bob Miller, Ph.D., Rosenberger Professor of Christian Thought and Religious Studies
9–10:15 a.m.
The Book of Ecclesiastes has got to be the strangest book in the Bible, since it questions—and even denies—the basic message of the rest of the Bible. According to traditional Jewish rabbis, nobody under thirty should be allowed to read this book. Find out why.

Environmental History and the American Revolution
Dave Hsiung, Ph.D., Dr. Charles R. and Shirley A. Knox Chair in History
9-10:15 a.m. - NEW DAY and TIME
How have human ideas and actions changed the natural world, and how have those changes then subsequently shaped what people have thought and how they acted? With respect to the American Revolution, you might be surprised by how cod fishing in Canadian waters influenced protests to the Stamp Act, how skirmishes over flocks of sheep and fields of hay pushed some Americans to support independence, and how musket balls not only killed combatants 240 years ago but may endanger us even today.

Science and Society
Kathy Jones, Ph.D., professor of education
9–10:15 a.m.
This discussion-based class will cover the findings of scientific “hot topics” currently in the news. It is a great way to check your own scientific literacy whether you were a science or non-science major. A semester-long course with the same content is offered to current students and fulfills the "cultural analysis" general education requirement.

"The Times They Were a Changin'": The Sixties Generation in the 21st Century, A special discussion for the Class of 1967
Maxine Phillips '67 and J. Robert Gray ’67 
9–10:15 a.m.
The Class of ’67 came to campus the year John Kennedy was assassinated and left as the civil rights movement was being torn apart and the antiwar movement was gaining momentum. How did the times we lived through shape our lives? Let's talk. Bob Gray ’67 and Maxine Phillips ’67 will lead class members in a discussion.

Birth of a Salesman: Raymond Loewy and the Rise of American Industrial Design
John Wall, director of media relations
10:30–11:45 a.m.
Although few remember him by name, everybody knows the designs of Raymond Loewy—Studebaker cars, streamlined locomotives, Air Force One’s color scheme, logos for Shell, Exxon, and International Harvester—but how did this man, who arrived to the U.S. from France after WW I use his own image to help create the profession of industrial designers? This class will cover the long career of industrial designer Raymond Loewy (1899-1986) and how he created a “personal brand” to market his skills and his company. This class explains why you buy what you buy, and why Loewy believed “the loveliest curve is a rising sales graph.”

Renaissance and Baroque Works in the Juniata College Museum of Art
Laura Wingard, instructor in art history
10:30–11:45 a.m.
This class will examine a small selection of works in the collection of the JCMA from the 17th and 18th centuries, including Rembrandt’s etching, Christ Driving the Money Changers from the Temple, and Tiepolo’s painting, Angels Carrying the Vestments of Christ. This class will offer participants the opportunity to examine the works in person in the museum and to learn about their artists, styles, and subjects, and also about conservation efforts on some of the pieces.

The Wonder Baby: The Immanuel Prophecy in Isaiah and Matthew
Bob Miller, Ph.D., Rosenberger Professor of Christian Thought and Religious Studies
10:30–11:45 a.m.
During a national crisis in ancient Israel, the prophet Isaiah foretold the birth of a boy who would make everything all right. The New Testament tells us that this prophecy was fulfilled in the (supposedly) virgin birth of Jesus. This class examines what Isaiah thought his prophecy meant and the fascinating way it was “repurposed” for the story of Jesus.

Understanding Trout Movement
Uma Ramakrishnan, Ph.D., associate professor of environmental science and studies, and Dennis Johnson, Ph.D., professor of environmental science and studies
10:30–11:45 a.m.
Participants will learn about the Little Juniata River systems and the use of radio telemetry to track fish. We will also discuss habitat and seasonal movement patterns.

Class of 1967 Lunch on the Lake
11 a.m.–3 p.m.
Shuster Hall, Raystown Field Station
Drive on your own or meet in front of Ellis Hall for transportation. Depart campus at 11:00 a.m. Return trips to campus depart Field Station at 1:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m.

Enjoy a delicious picnic lunch at noon then spend the afternoon enjoying nature at Shuster Hall and Grove Farm. There will be boat rides on Raystown Lake available for class members and their guests. (Space is limited to 28 passengers.)

             Lunch Prices
             Class of ’67 Member: Complimentary
             Adult (non-class member): $12.00

             Boat Ride Price
             $10.00 per person

Buffet Lunch
11:45 a.m.–1 p.m. 
Baker Refectory, Ellis Hall

             Prices
             Adult: $10.00
             Child age 6-12: $5.00
             Child 5 and under: Free
             Class of ’67 Member: Complimentary

Alumni Association Annual Meeting
1–4:30 p.m. 
Sill Boardroom, von Liebig Center for Science
Open to all alumni.

Alzheimer's Disease: Diabetes Type III
Debra Kirchhof-Glazier, Ph.D., professor of biology
1:15–2:30 p.m.
Alzheimer's disease is now being recognized as type 3 diabetes. This presentation will explain why and provide exciting breakthroughs in food-as-medicine research that will substantially lower your risk.

Eras, Styles, and Emotions: 18th and 19th Century Piano - An Interactive Exploration
Guy Croyle '72
1:15–2:30 p.m.
Two German composers, two different eras, two different styles, two different ways of expressing emotion. We will collaboratively explore these elements together with representative examples from the 18th and 19th century piano repertoire.

Horseshoe Crab Migration to the Delaware Bay
David Newcomer, M.D. '69, general surgeon
1:15–2:30 p.m.
This presentation deals with the remarkable spring migration of hundreds of thousands of horseshoe crabs (sp. Limulus polyphemus) to the Delaware Bay every year for breeding, with emphasis on their ecological importance.

Friends of the Library Annual Meeting
2 p.m.
Information Commons, Beeghly Library
All are welcome to attend.

Beeghly Library Open House
2–4 p.m. 
Beeghly Library
Everyone is welcome to view various displays of Juniata history, special collections, and rare books. There will also be a small book sale. Hosted by the Friends of the Library.

How You Can Be a Published Author, Too!
Esther (Phillips) Clark '72, retired teacher
2:45–4 p.m.
Who would have guessed that a paper written during senior year for Mrs. Miller’s Children’s Literature class would become a published book? Indeed, it did! Listen to Esther (Phillips) Clark ’72 read her story, A Wish for Winellda the Witch, and learn the process she used to fulfill a lifelong dream of becoming an author. Autographed books will be available for purchase, and the proceeds will go to the Juniata Scholarship Fund.

The Future of Film
Donna S. Weimer, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Communication and Theatre Art, Thornbury Professor of Communication
2:45–4 p.m.
The subject matter, the technology, and the business structure of the  film industry is changing dramatically. What do you need to know about going to see a film in the theatre, online streaming into your homes, and about the future of 3D and Virtual Reality? Let's talk.

Tolstoy’s Search for a Meaningful Life in the Face of Death and War: Sharing the Joy of Faculty-Student Research
Shelby A. Pio '17, Program of Emphasis in Russian, and Jim Roney, Ph.D., I. Harvey Brumbaugh Professor of Russian and International Studies
2:45–4 p.m.
A joint, interactive talk on how Tolstoy found meaning in the face of human morality and the chaos of war. The presenters will discuss how undergraduate research works and share Tolstoy’s wisdom and insight with participants who are encouraged to share their own life experiences. Examples will be provided from Tolstoy’s story on medical care at the end of life (Death of Ivan Ilyich), works on war and how to overcome (Sevastopol Stories and War and Peace), and his great analysis of the hope and dangers of romantic love (Anna Karenina). Participants are encouraged to read Death of Ivan Ilyich prior to class.

We are All Biased: The Ways in which Human Decision-Making is Predictably Irrational
Rebecca Weldon, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology
2:45–4 p.m.
Humans are inconsistent and error-prone decision-makers. We tend to take risks even though the consequences could be fatal (e.g., drinking and driving) and behave in ways that are not consistent with our long-term goals in favor of something “now” (e.g., foregoing the long-term goal of saving money to splurge on a new television). The presentation will include in-class demonstrations of inconsistencies in reasoning and some of the most compelling behavioral and neuroscientific evidence that points to the fallibility of human decision making.

Reunion Committee Meeting
4:30–5 p.m. 
Neff Lecture Hall, von Liebig Center for Science
Reunion committee members are encouraged to attend this meeting to receive updates and information on the weekend’s activities.

All-Class Celebration
Enjoy light hors d’oeuvres while mingling with alumni, faculty, and staff at the reception. Dinner will follow as well as conversation, recognition, and a special tribute to the Class of 1967.

All-Class Reception
5:30–6:15 p.m.
Ellis Hall

All-Class Dinner
6:30–8:30 p.m.
Baker Refectory, Ellis Hall

             Prices
             Adult: $30.00
             Child age 6-12: $12.00
             Child 5 and under: Free
             Class of ’67 Member: Complimentary

Class of 1967 50th Reunion Gathering
8:30–11 p.m.
Information Commons, Beeghly Library
Join your classmates for a casual evening of reminiscing and reconnecting immediately following the All-Class Dinner. Snacks, soft drinks, beer, and wine will be provided.

Reunion Class Gatherings for Emeriti, 1957, 1962, 1972, 1977, 1982, 1987, and 1992
8:30–11 p.m.
Locations: TBA
Snacks and soft drinks will be provided. Attendees are welcome to bring their own alcoholic beverages.

Blue & Gold Gathering
8:30–11 p.m. 
Members of the Juniata family who are not celebrating a class reunion are welcome to join Alumni Council for this social gathering. Snacks and soft drinks will be provided. Attendees are welcome to bring their own alcoholic beverages.

Saturday, June 3

With more classes, meetings, and tours, you’ll wish the weekend didn’t have to end. Don’t miss the Alumni Awards Assembly, picnic lunch, and President Troha’s question-and-answer session. Enjoy dinner with your classmates and reminisce about your favorite Juniata memories.

Mini Lessons on a Percussion Instrument
Dr. James Latten, professor of music
By Appointment
Have some fun with our collection of percussion instruments! Schedule a single private or semiprivate 30- to 45-minute lesson on your choice of instrument: snare drum, timpani, drum set, xylophone, or small accessories. Try something new or relive memories of music making on an instrument you used to play. We’ll also listen to a couple of the popular excerpts in band/orchestra music for the instrument(s). Lessons will take place on Saturday and must be scheduled prior to Alumni Weekend on a first come, first serve basis, so don’t delay. Contact Dr. Latten by May 19th at latten@juniata.edu or 814-641-3471 to schedule. Sticks, mallets, etc., will be provided.

Bird Walk
Dr. Charles Yohn ’83, executive director, Raystown Field Station
7–10:30 a.m.
Meet in front of Ellis Hall.
This class is ideal for beginners and will guide birders through the Old Crow Wetlands. Bring your favorite binoculars and field guide or use the ones provided. Transportation and boxed breakfast is included in the class fee. Limited spaces available.

             Price
             $6.00 per person

Registration
7:30 a.m.–7 p.m.
Lobby, von Liebig Center for Science
Pick up room keys and registration packets with itineraries upon arrival.

Buffet Breakfast
8–9 a.m. 
Baker Refectory, Ellis Hall

             Prices
             Adult: $6.00
             Child age 6-12: $3.00
             Child 5 and under: Free
             Class of ’67 Member: Complimentary

President’s Milestone Breakfast (By invitation only)
8:30 a.m.
Suzanne von Liebig Theatre, Halbritter Center for Performing Arts
President Troha will host a very special breakfast to honor and celebrate our alumni and friends who have reached a philanthropic milestone.

Campus Tour
9:30–10:45 a.m. 
Meet in the main lobby of von Liebig Center for Science.
Student tour guides lead small groups around campus to see what’s changed and what hasn’t.

Beeghly Library Open House
9 a.m.–5 p.m. 
Lobby, Beeghly Library
Everyone is welcome to view various displays of Juniata history, special collections, and rare books. There will also be a small book sale. Hosted by Friends of the Library.

Adventures of the Remote Field Course
Kathy Jones, Ph.D, professor of education, John Matter, Ph.D., associate professor of biology, Jim Borgardt, Ph.D., professor of physics, and Dave Widman, Ph.D. professor of psychology
9:30–10:45 a.m.
Hear stories from the faculty who escort Juniata students across the country to camp in the southwest deserts of New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, and Utah all while teaching interdisciplinary units on ecology, education, physics, and psychology. Originally conceived as a summer course and implemented first in 2000, the Remote Field Course has expanded to include a preparatory course in the spring semester. Combine 40 - 45 students, three or four faculty members, and more than 6,000 miles over two and a half weeks for a lifetime of memories!

How Boomers will Impact Healthcare in the 21st Century
Lee Mell '67, Ph.D., MBA, HCLD (ABB), retired commander, US Navy, Medical Service Corp
9:30–10:45 a.m.
Each day since 2011, and for the next 14 years, 10,000 Baby Boomers will retire. This sheer volume of the senior Boomer population, surpassed only in the last two years by the millennial generation, will have a massive and profound impact on the US healthcare system as it currently exists. How the most educated, but least prepared financially and emotionally, generation in American history will affect healthcare will be discussed.

How Immigration is Reshaping America
Steven A. Camarota '87, Ph.D., director of research, Center for Immigration Studies
9:30–10:45 a.m.
It is difficult to find a public policy that has a more profound impact on American society than immigration. The number of immigrants (legal and illegal) in the country has doubled since 1990, tripled since 1980, and quadrupled since 1970. Although most of the national debate has focused on illegal immigration, legal immigrants are much more numerous than illegal immigrants. Furthermore, legal immigration has a much larger impact on public coffers, the labor market, schools, health care, the electorate, and a host of other issue areas. The presentation will discuss how immigration is reshaping American society and what is likely to happen under the Trump administration.

Labyrinth Workshop
Marty (Utts) Jones '67, Ph.D., LSW, certified labyrinth facilitator
9:30–10:45 a.m.
The classic labyrinth is considered to be the oldest human-made design and is found throughout the world,  where it has been used in various ways throughout history. This workshop gives participants an overview of the history of labyrinths, how to distinguish them from mazes, and provide basics of how to use a labyrinth. Following the brief overview and discussion, everyone will have an opportunity to participate in a guided labyrinth walk.

Alumni Awards Assembly
11 a.m.–noon
Everyone is invited to attend the annual Alumni Awards Assembly for the recognition of award recipients: Harold B. Brumbaugh ’33 Alumni Service Award recipient, Karen V. Beck ’93; Alumni Achievement Award recipient, Howard M. Nathan ’75; William E. Swigart, Jr. ’37 Humanitarian Alumni Award recipient, Michael D. Johnston ’77; and Young Alumni Achievement Award recipient, Elena A. Long ’06.

Picnic on the Lawn           
11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.
Campus Quadrangle
(Rain location: Baker Refectory, Ellis Hall)

             Prices
             Adult: $13.50 
             Child age 6-12: $6.00
             Child 5 and under: Free
             Class of ’67 Member: Complimentary

Raystown Field Station Tour
12:30–3 p.m.
Drive on your own or meet in front of Ellis Hall for transportation. Shuttles depart campus at 12:30 p.m. and return from Field Station at 2:30 p.m.

Tour the certified “green” dining hall/multipurpose Lakeside Center, including Shuster Hall and David Robinson Lodges, at the Raystown Field Station. Please note that the center and main gate are open to visitors only during this time.

Visit Juniata’s Peace Chapel
1– 2 p.m.
Meet in front of Ellis Hall for transportation.
The Elizabeth Evans Baker Peace Chapel was designed by prominent artist Maya Lin, who also designed the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall.

Residence Halls Open House
1–3 p.m.
Take a tour down memory lane! Drop in anytime to visit the residence halls and see a room.

The Juniata Scholarship Fund and Class Team Meeting
1:15–2 p.m.
Rockwell Seminar Room, von Liebig Center for Science
The Juniata Scholarship Fund is successful because of the support of Class Teams and other volunteers. Please join us as we discuss new strategies for annual giving and help us determine a direction for the future of JSF. All are welcome.

Environmental History and the American Revolution with Dave Hsiung has been changed from Saturday at 1:15-2:30 p.m. to Friday at 9-10:15 a.m.

Juniata College 1968-1972–"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times." A special discussion for the Class of 1972
Ronald McAlpine '72, retired manager of electronic commerce, Ingersoll-Rand, current chairman of Calais Regional Hospital Board of Directors
1:15–2:30 p.m.
What do you remember about the Draft/Vietnam, NOW, and Woodstock? We lived through changes at Juniata, too, like no coats and ties for dinner, no dorm curfews, and live music allowed at dances. Join our classmates for an open discussion on how the Class of 1972 navigated the political and social changes that occurred during our time at Juniata.

One Man's Treasure!
Karen J. Rosell, Ph.D., professor of art history
1:15–2:30 p.m.
This is the story behind the richest art gift ever given to Juniata College. Quayton Stottlemyer's amazing multi-million dollar collection has transformed the College's museum and has provided unique learning opportunities for students and faculty alike. Dr. Karen Rosell led a collaborative team of students to photograph and document the approximately 500 artworks, and catalog them in full color. Edited by Amy Mathur, assistant professor of English, The Stottlemyer Collection: A Journey, was published in October 2014. Come and hear about this treasure trove!

The Kidnapping of Peggy Ann Bradnick
Peggy Ann Bradnick Jackson
1:15–2:30 p.m.
On May 11, 1966, at the age of 17, Peggy Ann Bradnick Jackson was abducted near the small town of Shade Gap, approximately 30 miles from Juniata College. Upon learning of the law enforcement and civilian manhunt, Juniata students and faculty were bussed to southern Huntingdon County to join the week-long search efforts. All are welcome to attend as the Class of 1967 welcomes Jackson, who will recount her story and share how this experience changed her life.

Forum on the Future with President James Troha
3–4 p.m.
Neff Lecture Hall, von Liebig Center for Science
Participants have the opportunity to discuss current and future goals and plans for the College with President Troha and members of the administration.

Juniata Admission Ambassadors (JAA) Reception
4:30–5:30 p.m.
All Alumni Weekend guests are invited to join us before dinner for Happy Hour with current JAA volunteers, students, and Admission Office staff. Celebrate with us as we toast our contributions to recruiting this year’s freshman class. In 2016, alumni attended over 50 college fairs and receptions, and recruited 164 students through the Juniata Community Scholarship program! Share your Juniata stories and hear some of ours. Meet the people who can help you get involved when you're ready.

Class of 1967 50th Reunion Events
The College will honor our 50th anniversary class with an evening of special activities, starting with the class photo, continuing with a reception hosted by President and Mrs. Troha, and culminating with the 50th reunion dinner. Plan on staying into the evening as opportunities to socialize and reconnect continue after dinner.

Class Photo
4:45 p.m.
Detwiler Plaza, Kennedy Sports and Recreation Center

President’s Reception and Champagne Toast
5:30 p.m. 
President’s Home
Shuttle transportation will be provided.

50th Reunion Dinner
7–11 p.m.
Baker Refectory, Ellis Hall

             Prices
             Class of ’67 Member: Complimentary
             Adult (non-class member): $32.00

Dinner for Classes of 1957 and 1962 and Emeriti Alumni at Westminster Woods
5:30 p.m.  Reception
6:15 p.m.  Dinner
Commons Dining Room, Westminster Woods
Westminster Woods, an active continuing care retirement community located less than a mile from campus, welcomes the Classes of 1957 and 1962 and other Emeriti Alumni as their special guests. The evening will begin with a wine and cheese reception on the patio followed by dinner, all compliments of Westminster Woods. Information on the community will be available at the dinner or at www.westminsterretirement.org.

Class Reunion Dinners for 1972, 1977, 1982, 1987, and 1992
6–7 p.m. Social
7–11 p.m. Dinner
Locations: TBA
This casual evening begins with a social hour followed by a buffet dinner. Attendees are welcome to bring their own alcoholic beverages.

             Prices
             Adult: $27.50
             Child age 6-12: $10.00
             Child 5 and under: Free

Blue & Gold Dinner
6–7 p.m. Social
7–11 p.m. Dinner
Members of the Juniata family who are not celebrating a class reunion are welcome to join Alumni Council for dinner. Attendees are welcome to bring their own alcoholic beverages.

             Prices
             Adult: $27.50
             Child age 6-12: $10.00
             Child 5 and under: Free

Class of 1957 After-Dinner Gathering
8–10 p.m.
Westminster Woods
Coffee, tea, and soft drinks will be provided. Attendees are welcome to bring their own alcoholic beverages.

Class of 1962 After-Dinner Gathering
8–11 p.m.
Coffee, tea, and soft drinks will be provided. Attendees are welcome to bring their own alcoholic beverages.

Sunday, June 4

Is it over already? Have a safe trip home and come back to visit soon!

Registration
8–11 a.m.
Lobby, von Liebig Center for Science
Return keys and name tags before departing. Residence hall check-out time is 10:30 a.m.

Buffet Breakfast
8–9:30 a.m.
Baker Refectory, Ellis Hall

             Prices
             Adult: $6.00
             Child age 6-12: $3.00
             Child 5 and under: Free
             Class of ’67 Member: Complimentary

Class of 1967 Farewell Breakfast
8–9:30 a.m.
Baker Refectory, Ellis Hall
The Class of ’67 will gather to cap off the weekend and bid each other a fond farewell before departing campus. Look for the reserved tables in Baker Refectory.

             Prices
             Class of '67 Member: Complimentary
             Adult (non-class member): $6.00